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Interreligious

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Co-sponsored with Union Theological Seminary

A conversation between UTS President Professor Serene Jones and JTS Chancellor Professor Arnold Eisen, celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Abraham Joshua Heschel's revolutionary address at Union Theological Seminary.

Moderated by Prof. John Thatamanil, Associate Professor of Theology and World Religions, UTS

By Louis Polisson | Student, The Rabbinical School, JTS

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It is not in Heaven
And I did not know
I said: "Who shall go up for us to heaven?
I don't want to, I don't care
I don't understand..."

And now I know
That there is Torah in this place
But I'm still not sure
If there is God
In Beth-El, or in Hebron

If the word is very close to us
And I believe that it is in your mouth and in your heart
Why are we not doing it?

If Luz was the name of the city at first
Then he called the name of the place Beth-El
Why can't we remember Luz as well?
And remember that in the image of God
the One

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The Milstein Center for Interreligious Dialogue of The Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) in New York City and the John Paul II Center for Interreligious Dialogue at the Angelicum in Rome, with thanks to the Russell Berrie Foundation, host the Annual John Paul II Center Lecture for Interreligious Understanding.

New York Times National Religion Correspondent Laurie Goodstein moderates a question and answer session following the lecture.

Cardinal Dolan has been archbishop of New York for six years and will be speaking about the current state of Jewish-Catholic dialogue in New York and in the

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“A Dialogue of Life” is a book about interreligious dialogue between Jews and Christians, but it is so much more. It is a book to be savored, like poetry. A book to be pondered, like philosophy. A book that guides us to the most difficult of all human endeavors: listening, truly listening to one another.”
—Rabbi Burton L. Visotzky, Ph.D. Appleman Professor of Midrash and Interreligious Studies, Director, Milstein Center for Interreligious Dialogue, JTS

 

About the Authors

Rabbi Silvina Chemen was ordained as a rabbi in 2006 at the rabbinical school for Latin America, Seminario Rabinico.

By Rabbi Matthew Berkowitz | Director of Israel Programs, The Rabbinical School, JTS

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With the opening of the book of Leviticus and its keen focus on sacrifices this coming Shabbat, many laypeople and clergy alike begin an exegetical struggle for connection and relevance. Though the chancellor acknowledges this difficulty, he rightly encourages us to dig deeper in the text and in ourselves as “Leviticus aims to heighten and sanctify ordinary experience” (ibid., 71). Where may we find a vivid example in Parashat Va-yikra that opens this cryptic text to “sanctifying ordinary experience” in the modern world?

Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch latches on to Leviticus 1:2, “Speak to the

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A Discussion with Author Dr. Richard Kalmin, Theodore R. Racoosin Chair of Rabbinic Literature, JTS

Dr. David Kraemer, Joseph J. and Dora Abbell Librarian and professor of Talmud and Rabbinics, JTS, served as moderator.

Library book talks are available as a podcast from iTunes or by opening the feed with your podcast catcher.

By JTS | The Jewish Theological Seminary

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A Project of The Jewish Theological Seminary, Hartford Seminary, and The Islamic Society of North America
Editors: Kim Zeitman and Dr. Mohamed Elsanousi

Sharing the Well: A Resource Guide for Jewish Muslim Engagement is designed to assist and enhance Jewish-Muslim interactions at the community level.

By Rabbi Matthew Berkowitz | Director of Israel Programs, The Rabbinical School, JTS

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Parashat Behar opens with the commandment to observe the sabbatical cycle (for six years, one may plant crops and work the land and then, in the seventh year, the land must rest—what is known in halakhic terms as shenat shemitah, “the year of release”); shemitah or “release” is observed today in the Land of Israel.

By Rabbi Matthew Berkowitz | Director of Israel Programs, The Rabbinical School, JTS

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With the opening of the book of Leviticus and its keen focus on sacrifices this coming Shabbat, many laypeople and clergy alike begin an exegetical struggle for connection and relevance. Chancellor Arnold Eisen describes the annual crisis well, commenting that

Leviticus is not terribly popular among American Jews . . . Take on the task of assigning members of a prayer or study group to lead discussions on upcoming portions of Torah, and you will have no difficulty finding volunteers for most sections of Genesis or Exodus.

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February 18, 2014--The Annual John Paul II Center Lecture at The Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS), this panel focuses on how Jews and Muslims can learn from one another how to best form uniquely American religious identities that will serve them into adulthood and communal responsibility. Panelists include Imam Abdullah Antepli of Duke University, Rabbi Gail Swedroe of the University of Florida Hillel, and Professor Mehnaz Afridi of Manhattan College. Huffington Post Executive Religion Editor Rev. Paul Raushenbush moderates.

 

This event was sponsored by the JTS Milstein Center for

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